Canyoneering in Arches National Park – Lost and Found

(Last Updated On: November 11, 2015)

After the first day of canyoneering, we returned to our camp near Lost Spring, saying good-bye to our new friend Kate. We enjoyed stories by a warm campfire, but the night was unusually cold – much colder than the night before.

We awoke to crispy frost on nearly every surface possible, even after resisting the need to emerge out of the sleeping bag like a tortoise out of its shell. Our tent made crunching noises from ice chunks that speckled its exterior as I unzipped the fly, despite the fact that it had been baking in the daylight for well over an hour. Frigid air clung around us, and the breeze seemed to be winning the battle for coolness over the warm sun.

But, such is life in November in the desert. Just to stay warm, we hurried to get ready. Movement was key. Without it we were cold. It was time to return to canyoneering in Arches National Park.

We then headed to the start of Lost and Found Canyon, which has the same start as the two canyons that we’d ventured into the day before. But, this time we knew we did not want to do the same climbing exit, and decided to leave a car at Lost Spring for a hiking exit instead.

Walking to Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park.

We walked a ways to get to the start of Lost and Found, eventually funneling into a wash requiring some canyoneering moves.
Lost and Found, canyoneering Arches National Park.

Canyoneering in Lost and Found, Arches National Park.

Unlike rock climbing, canyoneering moves seem less graceful – well, at least to us as novices.
Frank Konsella, canyoneering Lost and Found, Arches National Park.

Frank Konsella, canyoneering Lost and Found, Arches National Park

The canyon was very “slotty”.
slot canyon - Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park

The first rappel was aesthetic, dropping down a donut hole in the rock into the chasm below.
First rappel on Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park.

And then there were some more canyoneering moves.
canyoneering moves, Lost and Found, Arches National Park.

A few more slot moves got us to the 2nd rappel. Natalie getting ready to drop down.
Entrance of 2nd rappel in Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park

Me.
Lost and Found, Canyoneering Arches National Park.

Frank on the 2nd rappel.
2nd rappel in Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park

2nd rappel in Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park

Natalie certainly made some of the canyoneering moves look a bit more natural.
Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park.

This tricky spot led us right to the top of the third rap.
Lost and Found, canyoneering Arches National Park.

The third rappel.
Third rappel on Lost and Found, canyoneering Arches National Park.

Natalie dropping down.
Third Rappel, Lost and Found, Arches National Park

Third rappel, Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park.

This last rappel was a good one, and required two ropes. Frank.
Third rappel, Lost and Found, canyoneering in Arches National Park.

After packing up from the third and final rap, we headed down the narrow canyon.
Lost and Found canyon, Arches National Park.

The canyon quickly emerged to a much wider canyon, which we also followed downstream.
Canyoneering in Arches National Park

Canyoneering in Arches National Park

I guess it’s only appropriate that we spied an arch. It IS Arches National Park afterall!
Canyoneering in Arches National Park

After awhile, we met up with another canyon that merged from our right and began following its wash upstream toward Lost Spring where we’d left our car.
Canyoneering in Arches National Park

Eventually, we were “wash-whacking”.
Canyoneering in Arches National Park

A split in the washes again brought us to a dry stream bed that was laden in quartz.
Canyoneering in Arches National Park

We still had to climb out of the canyon, but we found a fairly easy spot to do so.

Alas, a view of the La Sals.
La Sal Mountains

Though it was time to wrap up out weekend adventure, I wouldn’t be surprised if we started making this an annual fall event! But, its on to the next season of us now. Plenty of white stuff in the high country to begin quenching our thirst!


Want to do these canyons yourself?

Knowledge of rappeling, anchor building, and rock climbing is a must. But, we found a lot of useful information on roadtripryan.com.

Brittany Walker Konsella

Aside from skiing, biking, and all outdoorsy things,Brittany Walker Konsella also loves smiles and chocolate 🙂 Even though she excels at higher level math and chemistry, she still confuses left from right. Find out more about Brittany!

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Summary
Canyoneering in Arches National Park
Article Name
Canyoneering in Arches National Park
Description
Lost and Found, a slot canyon requiring three rappels, is one of the treasures of canyoneering in Arches National Park. Read the reaport to find out why!
Author

Brittany Walker Konsella

Aside from skiing, biking, and all outdoorsy things, Brittany Walker Konsella also loves smiles and chocolate :) Even though she excels at higher level math and chemistry, she still confuses left from right. Find out more about Brittany!

One thought on “Canyoneering in Arches National Park – Lost and Found

  • November 11, 2015 at 5:47 pm
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    Great recap! Absolutely enjoyed exploring the canyons with you two. Love the shot of Frank “stuck” on that ledge, haha. You’re absolutely right, canyoneering moves are not like anything else, and very different from rock climbing, but it’s fun to figure them out, huh? I sure hope you liked it enough to make canyoneering an annual trip. But I think I am ready for snow now 🙂

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